Nation Of Compromise Unit

United States History
Unit #1 A Nation of Compromise
The purpose of this unit is to re-visit early United States history so that students can connect and recall events vital to their knowledge base and understanding prior to moving forward. It is essential that all students can explain and demonstrate how the United States government is based on the principles of consensus and compromise.

Unit Enduring Understandings:
Creating a democratic-republic would prove difficult and would necessitate the need for experimentation and compromise on the part of the Founding Fathers.

Westward movement and national expansion presented the country and its leaders with opportunities as well as moral dilemmas.



  1. Current Issues: Summer 2017 "Hate in America" Special Report Time Magazine August 28, 2017 
          Activity: History in Dispute: Charlottesville and Confederate Monuments
          "Why Lee Should Go, and Washington Should Stay" by John Meacham

  1. Revisiting History Discussion: English Colonization of America; Economic Opportunity / Religious Freedom      The Americans p. 42-71

  1. Lecture: European Powers Compete for America
      Colonial Wars: King William’s War, Queen Anne’s War
                                     King George’s War, The French and Indian War
                                                                The Americans p.66-89
                                                                Video clip: Last of the Mohicans

  1. Chart: Acts of Parliament; Proclamation Act, Sugar Act, Quartering Act, Stamp Act, Townshend Acts, Intolerable/Coercive Acts            The Americans p. 94-102                                                                                                                                                                                     Ted Lesson: Crash Course: Prelude to Revolution 

  1. Video: Revolutionary War Series (Selected Clips)

  1. America Declares Independence
                                                    American Firebrand: Thomas Paine (Common Sense)
                                                    The Americans p. 103-112

  1. Articles of Confederation: Achievements & Failures
            U.S. Constitution: “Bundle of Compromises”              The Americans p. 130-149

8.  Nation of Compromises Performance Task: Working as pairs students will choose an issue to investigate and analyze from the time period of 1787-1850 in order to demonstrate the essential understanding of compromise as a principle of governing in United States history. Students will explore opposing viewpoints for the issue and reflect on the immediate and long term impact of the compromise. Each group must share their analysis and findings in a class forum and will submit a 3-4 page, MLA formatted paper on the issue. Lead questions will be developed in order to guide your analysis. A minimum of four resources (two digital, two print) is required. Your conclusion will respond to the prompt: “Compromise is a principle that defines us as a nation and throughout our history wise men have used compromise to resolve crises for the good of the nation.”                                                                     
Constitutional Convention, Federalistsv. Anti-Federalists, Transition of Power (1796, 1800, 1824), Jay treaty, Alienn& Sedition Acts, Louisiana Purchase, Missouri Compromise, Nullification Crisis (Tariff Compromise), Compromise of 1850 Territorial Expansion, Sectionalism, Slavery                                                                                                                    
U.S. History: Nation of Compromises Rubric
Essential Understanding: The United States Government is based on the principles of consensus and compromise.

4
Exemplary
3
Accomplished
2
Developing
1
Beginning
Identify Problem/
Question  
(Critical Thinking)
Clearly identifies the crisis addressing the nation and closely examines the opposing and/or varied remedies to the crisis. Insightful and creative questions probe the complexity of the issue.
Adequately identifies the crisis addressing the nation and carefully examines the opposing and/or varied remedies to the crisis. Meaningful questions gauge the complexity of the issue.
Identifies with assistance the crisis addressing the nation and examines the opposing and/or varied remedies to the crisis. Uses questions to recognize the difficulty of the issue.
Needs significant assistance to identify the crisis addressing the nation. Examination of the opposing views is attempted through simplistic questions.
     Content/
Knowledge
  (Effective Communication)
Exceptional depth of knowledge demonstrated, masterfully utilizing both prior and new information on how American leaders dealt with the difficulties and crises that confronted the young nation.
Proficient depth of knowledge demonstrated, appropriately accessing both prior and new information on how American leaders dealt with the difficulties and crises that confronted the young nation.
Uncomfortable command of knowledge demonstrated, with limited and/or disconnected use of prior and new information on how American leaders dealt with the difficulties and crises that confronted the young nation.
Confused and/or disinterested grasp of knowledge with limited capability to connect prior and new information on how American leaders dealt with the difficulties and crises confronted the young nation.
 Evaluation and Use of Resources
(Information Literacy)
Selects and evaluates highly appropriate and relevant sources including primary sources. Skilled application of MLA formatting.
(diaries, journals, letters, newspapers)
Selects mostly appropriate and relevant sources, including primary sources. Proper application of MLA formatting.
(textbooks, media center references)
Narrow selection and simplistic use of resources. Sporadic and/or inconsistent application of MLA formatting.
(textbooks, media center references)
Poor selection and misguided/limited use of resources. Little to no effort in the application of MLA formatting.
(textbooks)
Organization

Writing demonstrates logical, subtle sequencing of ideas through well developed paragraphs; a gripping introduction and  a strong conclusion.
Writing demonstrates careful and fluent sequencing of ideas through well developed paragraphs; focused introduction and effective conclusion.
Writing demonstrates some organization of ideas with paragraphs that struggle to flow in a coherent manner; introduction and conclusion are evident.
Writing demonstrates limited and/or illogical organization of ideas with disconnected paragraphs; incoherent and underdeveloped introduction and conclusion.
Management of Time
(Learning Skills)
Research paper  is submitted on time with the student expertly prepared to discuss their work in a class forum; highly effective use of class time and strong evidence of effort outside of class.
Research paper  is submitted on time with the student well prepared to discuss their work in a class forum; appropriate use of class time and evidence of effort outside of class.
Research paper  is only partially completed for class with the student somewhat prepared to discuss their work in a class forum; use of class time and out of class time needs improvement.
Research paper  is late with the student inadequately prepared to discuss work in a class forum; inappropriate use of class time and little to no evidence of out of class time.

Compromise Forum 
Research Paper due

Research Process for Performance Task:

·        Selection of topic to examine the principles of consensus and compromise

·        Obtain general knowledge of the topic (Textbook)

·        Plan strategy to guide inquiry (Media Center Resources: US History in Context, Debatable Issues in U.S. History))

·        Uncover new information by investigating opposing viewpoints (Note-taking)

·        Analyze/Evaluate information; establish ownership

·        Respond to the statement/prompt with a judgment (Conclusion)

Question to Drive Research:

·        What crisis or dilemma confronted the nation?
·        What were the major arguments on either side of the issue?
·        Who were the key players on either side of the issue?
·        What views were expressed by the key players?
·        How effective were the opposing sides in getting their points across?
·        Was there common ground between the opposing sides?
·        Was the crisis/dilemma settled in a way that benefited the nation?


Missouri Compromise 1820
Crisis:

            The issue of slavery had been debated by American leaders and society since the very beginning of our nation’s history. Delegates at the Constitutional Convention of 1787 had disagreed on whether or not slaves should be counted as part of a state’s population for deciding how many representatives each state would send to the House of Representatives. This difference was eventually settled by the Three-Fifths Compromise. It was also decided that Congress could not interfere with the foreign slave trade until 1808.
            As new states entered the Union during the early years of the nineteenth century slavery was mostly a state issue, with each state determining whether they would be free or slave. However, with all the new lands gained from the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 and the potential for many new states to enter the Union the issue of expansion of slavery became more heated between the Northern and Southern states. The crisis came to a head in 1819 when Missouri applied for statehood as a slave state. At the time there were 11 free and 11 slave states. If Missouri was allowed to enter the Union as a slave state it would off set the balance in the United States Senate where every state had two senators. The power shift would be in favor of the slave states.    

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